ODSIM : an object-distance simulation method for conditioning complex natural structures.

in: Proc. 29th Gocad Meeting, Nancy

Abstract

Stochastic simulation of categorical objects is traditionally achieved either with object-based or pixel-based methods. Whereas object-based modeling provides realistic results but raises data conditioning problems, pixel-based modeling provides exact data conditioning but may lose some features of the simulated objects such as connectivity. We suggest a combination of a Euclidean distance transform and a thresholding, to combine both shape realism and strict data conditioning. This object-distance simulation method (ODSIM), uses a perturbed distance to objects, and is particularly appropriate for modeling structures resulting from rock transformations such as karsts, late dolomitized rocks and mineralized veins. We demonstrate this method to simulate dolomite geometry and, at small scale, to reproduce the void/solid phase distribution in a porous medium.

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BibTeX Reference

@INPROCEEDINGS{Henrion2GM2009,
    author = { Henrion, Vincent and Caumon, Guillaume and Cherpeau, Nicolas },
     title = { ODSIM : an object-distance simulation method for conditioning complex natural structures. },
 booktitle = { Proc. 29th Gocad Meeting, Nancy },
      year = { 2009 },
  abstract = { Stochastic simulation of categorical objects is traditionally achieved either with object-based or pixel-based methods. Whereas object-based modeling provides realistic results but raises data conditioning problems, pixel-based modeling provides exact data conditioning but may lose some features of the simulated objects such as connectivity. We suggest a combination of a Euclidean distance transform and a thresholding, to combine both shape realism and strict data conditioning. This object-distance simulation method (ODSIM), uses a perturbed distance to objects, and is particularly appropriate for modeling structures resulting from rock transformations such as karsts, late dolomitized rocks and mineralized veins. We demonstrate this method to simulate dolomite geometry and, at small scale, to reproduce the void/solid phase distribution in a porous medium. }
}