Segmented faults, splay faults and ower structures: a geomodeling perspective.

in: Proc. 33rd Gocad Meeting, Nancy

Abstract

Over the past decade, the development of implicit surfaces to represent geological structures has allowed for significant improvement in the automation and robustness of fault network modeling. However, complex fault networks and splay faults are not easily represented with implicit surfaces and call for specific modeling strategies. In this paper, we review the origin and main features of various complex fault configurations encountered in nature as described in the literature. Then, we propose three formalisms combining structural geology and topology to describe faults. The base formalism is appropriate for isolated and branching faults. The piecewise formalism makes it possible to build faults with internal branch lines. The composite formalism is closer to structural geology and clears the path to a unified theoretical framework for describing faults.

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BibTeX Reference

@INPROCEEDINGS{CaumonGM2013,
    author = { Caumon, Guillaume and Laurent, Gautier and Ford, Mary and Julio, Charline and Bonneau, Francois },
     title = { Segmented faults, splay faults and ower structures: a geomodeling perspective. },
 booktitle = { Proc. 33rd Gocad Meeting, Nancy },
      year = { 2013 },
  abstract = { Over the past decade, the development of implicit surfaces to represent geological structures has allowed for significant improvement in the automation and robustness of fault network modeling. However, complex fault networks and splay faults are not easily represented with implicit surfaces and call for specific modeling strategies. In this paper, we review the origin and main features of various complex fault configurations encountered in nature as described in the literature. Then, we propose three formalisms combining structural geology and topology to describe faults. The base formalism is appropriate for isolated and branching faults. The piecewise formalism makes it possible to build faults with internal branch lines. The composite formalism is closer to structural geology and clears the path to a unified theoretical framework for describing faults. }
}