Rock record reconstruction of channelized systems through reverse migration simulation conditioned to seismic stratal slices

in: 11th International Conference on Fluvial Sedimentology, 11th International Conference on Fluvial Sedimentology, Calgary, Canada

Abstract

Three-dimensional spatial modeling of consistent channelized systems requires to account for different continuous and discrete natural processes. The latter mainly consist in abandoned meanders. These witnesses of the spatial evolution of the system occasionally survive to the posterior reworking of the channel belt. In this case, these geobodies are generally brought out on seismic images and their consideration in the modeling of the system is valuable. The reconstruction of the channelized systems honoring these type of data calls for a reverse time approach. It starts from an interpretation of the last channel position on the seismic images. Then, it goes back in time by migrating the complete system backward in time, and integrating oxbow lakes according to their abandonment period. However, precise knowledge of the period of their abandonment is often difficult to obtain: only local relative chronologies can be deduced from clear cross-cutting relationships between paleo-geometries. We propose a semi-automatic tool for the simulation of the global chronology of paleo-geometries. This technique accounts for the obvious local relative chronologies between cross-cut paleo-geometries, and simulates the global one. The last channel path is reverse-migrated through a 3D iterative reverse migration applied on each half-meander. It considers abandoned meanders and their global chronology, probability distributions of migration offsets in the three natural directions of migration between two consecutive steps, and a maximal number of reverse migration steps. Our method has been applied on a seismic image of the McMurray formation in Canada, and provides various consistent global chronologies (Figure 1). The stochasticity of this method compensates the irreversibility of natural channel migration and helps to better assess the uncertainties in terms of abandonment ages and internal architecture variability.

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    BibTeX Reference

    @INPROCEEDINGS{,
        author = { Parquer, Marion and Collon, Pauline and Caumon, Guillaume },
         title = { Rock record reconstruction of channelized systems through reverse migration simulation conditioned to seismic stratal slices },
         month = { "jul" },
     booktitle = { 11th International Conference on Fluvial Sedimentology },
          year = { 2017 },
      location = { Calgary, Canada },
    organization = { 11th International Conference on Fluvial Sedimentology },
      abstract = { Three-dimensional spatial modeling of consistent channelized systems requires to account for different continuous and discrete natural processes. The latter mainly consist in abandoned meanders. These witnesses of the spatial evolution of the system occasionally survive to the posterior reworking of the channel belt. In this case, these geobodies are generally brought out on seismic images and their consideration in the modeling of the system is valuable. The reconstruction of the channelized systems honoring these type of data calls for a reverse time approach. It starts from an interpretation of the last channel position on the seismic images. Then, it goes back in time by migrating the complete system backward in time, and integrating oxbow lakes according to their abandonment period. However, precise knowledge of the period of their abandonment is often difficult to obtain: only local relative chronologies can be deduced from clear cross-cutting relationships between paleo-geometries.
    We propose a semi-automatic tool for the simulation of the global chronology of paleo-geometries. This technique accounts for the obvious local relative chronologies between cross-cut paleo-geometries, and simulates the global one. The last channel path is reverse-migrated through a 3D iterative reverse migration applied on each half-meander. It considers abandoned meanders and their global chronology, probability distributions of migration offsets in the three natural directions of migration between two consecutive steps, and a maximal number of reverse migration steps. Our method has been applied on a seismic image of the McMurray formation in Canada, and provides various consistent global chronologies (Figure 1). The stochasticity of this method compensates the irreversibility of natural channel migration and helps to better assess the uncertainties in terms of abandonment ages and internal architecture variability. }
    }