Structural Uncertainties: Do We Need a New Paradigm for the Seismic Structural Interpretation?

Florent Lallier and Charline Julio and Guillaume Caumon and Stephane Vignau and Pierre Bergey. ( 2014 )
in: Second EAGE Integrated Reservoir Modelling Conference

Abstract

On the basis of a field study, we discuss the need of a new paradigm for the construction of structural models. Indeed, within the traditional framework, building a 3D consistent fault network model consists in: first, picking faulting evidences on 3D seismic images and then, according to a priori concept derived from tectonic history, manually extrapolate in a consistent manner these evidences. The extrapolation step is actually the interpretation task that any structural geologist performs to build a 3D model from the observed evidences. However, such interpretations should not be considered as unique for uncertainty assessment and management. Therefore, we argue for the use of a stochastic system which will perform the extrapolation task (i.e. the construction of the 3D structural model). However, this computer method needs to be fed with similar geological knowledge as used in manual interpretation, such as structural style or interaction between faults of different tectonic origins. Integrating this conceptual information within a numerical system remains a key challenge.

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BibTeX Reference

@INPROCEEDINGS{Lallier2014EAGE,
    author = { Lallier, Florent and Julio, Charline and Caumon, Guillaume and Vignau, Stephane and Bergey, Pierre },
     title = { Structural Uncertainties: Do We Need a New Paradigm for the Seismic Structural Interpretation? },
 booktitle = { Second EAGE Integrated Reservoir Modelling Conference },
      year = { 2014 },
       doi = { 10.3997/2214-4609.20147482 },
  abstract = { On the basis of a field study, we discuss the need of a new paradigm for the construction of structural models. Indeed, within the traditional framework, building a 3D consistent fault network model consists in: first, picking faulting evidences on 3D seismic images and then, according to a priori concept derived from tectonic history, manually extrapolate in a consistent manner these evidences. The extrapolation step is actually the interpretation task that any structural geologist performs to build a 3D model from the observed evidences. However, such interpretations should not be considered as unique for uncertainty assessment and management. Therefore, we argue for the use of a stochastic system which will perform the extrapolation task (i.e. the construction of the 3D structural model). However, this computer method needs to be fed with similar geological knowledge as used in manual interpretation, such as structural style or interaction between faults of different tectonic origins. Integrating this conceptual information within a numerical system remains a key challenge. }
}