The RING team is seeking two outstanding PhD candidates to address research questions in integrative numerical geology. These full-time positions are for a three-year term and shall start in early 2020. The PhD topics outlined below, can be tailored to the interests and experience of the successful candidates. Details are available in this pdf description : PhD Topic description

Application files must be sent to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. before Nov 30th and must include:
- A cover letter,
- A CV, including contact information for two or more referees
- A research outcome (Master’s thesis or paper) written by the candidate
- A transcript of grades

PhD topic 1: Flow-based behavior of channelized sedimentary deposits: analysis and reproduction
   Keywords: Geostatistics, Flow simulation, Machine learning, Channels, Stochastic simulations
   Advisors: Pauline Collon and Guillaume Caumon

PhD topic 2: Local geomodel updating and trans-dimensional flow inverse problems
   Keywords: Inverse problem, Upscaling, Machine learning, Geomodeling, Unstructured meshes.
   Advisors: Guillaume Caumon and Mustapha Zakari
   Collaboration: Thomas Bodin (ENS Lyon)

You are interested by working on powerful statistical models for spatial prediction in a dynamic and friendly research environment? The RING Team of GeoRessources and the Institut Elie Cartan de Lorraine are seeking candidates a for a 2-year postdoc position to be started in the first quarter of 2020. Learn more...

The IAMG Student Chapter from University of Lorraine, France, is an active student chapter of the International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (IAMG). The IAMG is a scientific association at the frontier of geosciences, mathematics and computer sciences promoting international cooperation in the application and use of mathematics in geological research and technology.

Our Student Chapter, which has existed for more than 20 years, is historically related to the numerical geology research team from Nancy (known as the RING team) and the Nancy School of Geology. It includes MSc and PhD students with backgrounds in geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics and computer sciences who work on the topics of structural and stratigraphic modeling, physical process simulations, uncertainty characterization, meshing strategies, model complexity and scale management, data interpretation and integration, etc. We are currently looking forward to recruit new members with alternative backgrounds to diversify our spectrum of competences and develop new student collaborations.

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Student Chapter members

2019 Board:

Student members:

Name Year Research topic
 Pierre Anquez  Defended : 12/06/19  Surface model repair, simplification and automatic creation of sealed geological model
 Modeste Irakarama  Defended : 25/04/19  Reduction of structural uncertainties by waveform inversion
 Margaux Raguenel  Defense : 25/09/19  Flow simulation in fractured reservoirs on unstructured meshes
 Nicolas Clausolles  PhD (Last year)  Seismic interpretation and modeling of salt geobodies
 Yves Frantz  PhD (3rd year)  Stochastic simulation of karstic systems
 Corentin Gouache  PhD (3rd year)  Multiscale approach of the seismic waves propagation for earthquakes stochastic model development in France
 Melchior Schuh-senlis     PhD (3rd year)  ALE methods for the simulation of faults, salt structures and the restoration of geological models
 Paul Baville  PhD (2nd year)  Stochastic well correlation based on core samples and well log data
 Capucine Legentil  PhD (1st year)  Newcomer
 Celia Louarn  MSc  Development of an application for the computation of upscaling laws
 Leonore Gallot-Duval  MSc  Detection of truncations on seismic and satellite images
 Paul Marchal  MSc  Structural Incertitudes in Athabasca
 Morgan Thierry-Coudon  MSc  Implicit modeling with finite elements
 Arnaud Cayrol  MSc  Modeling of channelized meandering systems
 Thomas Cousin-Dechenaud  MSc  Modeling of stratigraphic grids in alluvial systems

Scientific production

Articles published in IAMG journals :

As members of the IAMG Student Chapter, we perform research at the interface between geosciences, mathematics and computer sciences. IAMG journals offer us a great opportunity to publish our work in high-quality interdisciplinary journals close to our research interests. You can find here the articles that were published by Student Chapter members in IAMG journals over the last three years:

Participations to IAMG Annual Conferences :

The IAMG also provides us the opportunity to travel and many members of the Student Chapter recently presented their work at the IAMG annual conference:


Activities

As an IAMG student chapter, we aim at developing the joint application of mathematics and computer sciences in the domains of geosciences, and especially to students. We organize various activities, both regular and occasional ones, to promote our research work and IAMG action.

Lectures

Our principal activity consists in organizing weekly lectures that are given either by Student Chapter members, permanent researchers from the RING team, or visiting colleagues. These lectures are the occasion to present and share our research advances, but also to get feedbacks and advice from colleagues on our work, and new insights on other research domains. The list of both past and incoming lectures can be found here.

 

Identity

We are an academic research team of École Nationale Supérieure de Géologie de Nancy and GeoRessources, a research unit of the Université de Lorraine, and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.

Combining geosciences, applied mathematics, and computer programming, we do methodological research to describe the geometry and heterogeneities of the subsurface consistently with observations (big, sparse and wide data) and geological concepts.

This research is done in partnership with academia and industry and capitalizes on 30 years of geomodeling expertise.

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Vision

21st century earth modeling is a tool to explore subsurface uncertainties, test geological scenarios, integrate across several physical simulators at the appropriate scale and finally support decisions.

Mission

We develop game-changing subsurface modeling technology to support industry and academia in better understanding subsurface processes and addressing natural resource management challenges.

As an academic research group, we also develop multidisciplinary skills in geoscience, software and engineering at the undergraduate and graduate levels to help students to understand, use, improve and test earth modeling software.

Values

The main values which guide how we fulfill our mission are:

  • Community: We value community both in the research group and in the community formed by our academic and industry partners to exchange and collaborate.
  • Expertise: We aim at the best science and technology.
  • Multidisciplinary: We are curious and firmly believe that the combination of knowledge from various areas creates value.
  • Critical Thinking and Creativity: We like to identify and bridge gaps with out-of-the-box thinking.
  • Integrity: We admit that a solution is seldom perfect and explicitly state our working hypotheses.

Strong legacy in geomodeling

RING finds its origin in the long tradition of combined engineering and Geosciences of the Nancy School of Geology, which has considered computer programming as part of the modern geologist's toolbox since the time of punch cards. Following the development of several automatic contouring methods in the 70's and 80's (GEOL, Cartolab), the research group increased its international recognition since the gOcad project was initiated in 1989 by Prof. Jean-Laurent Mallet.

The main technology breakthrough of the gOcad project was the combination of triangulated surfaces and Discrete Smooth Interpolation to represent complex geological structures such as salt diapirs. To address some limitations of the classical institutional funding structures, Jean-Laurent Mallet created the Gocad Research Consortium to provide financial and technical support to the project. This consortium developed our culture of industry collaboration through direct interaction with sponsors. After a few years, the fruitfult collaboration between Consortium Members and the Gocad Research Group gave birth to the Gocad software. To ensure maintenance, support and consulting services, the Gocad software became the leading commercial product of the EarthDecision company, created in 1998, then acquired by Paradigm (now Emerson) in 2006. RING and the School of Geology at University of Lorraine benefit from a generous donation of Paradigm software. Other RING industry transfers...

Since 2007, the research consortium and the research group have been directed by Guillaume Caumon. The structure has been continuing exploring and pushing the limits of geomodeling through original R&D addressing automation, scale, and uncertainty reduction.

 

In 2011, Jean-Laurent Mallet received the Erasmus Award 2011 from the European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, "in recognition of his groundbreaking research and development work over four decades in applied mathematics and computer sciences related to geology. Jean-Laurent Mallet originated Numerical Geology in Nancy as a Professor, first by developing automatic mapping methods in the 70's and 80's, then by creating the Gocad Consortium in 1989. In 2006, he retired from the university and has been working with Paradigm since then. 

RING finds its origin in the long tradition of combined engineering and Geosciences of the Nancy School of Geology, which has considered computer programming as part of the modern geologist's toolbox since the time of punch cards. Following the development of several automatic contouring methods in the 70's and 80's (GEOL, Cartolab), the research group increased its international recognition since the gOcad project was initiated in 1989 by Prof. Jean-Laurent Mallet.

The main technology breakthrough of the gOcad project was the combination of triangulated surfaces and Discrete Smooth Interpolation to represent complex geological structures such as salt diapirs. To address some limitations of the classical institutional funding structures, Jean-Laurent Mallet created the Gocad Research Consortium to provide financial and technical support to the project. This consortium developed our culture of industry collaboration through direct interaction with sponsors. After a few years, the fruitfult collaboration between Consortium Members and the Gocad Research Group gave birth to the Gocad software. To ensure maintenance, support and consulting services, the Gocad software became the leading commercial product of the EarthDecision company, created in 1998, then acquired by Paradigm Geophysical in 2006.

Since 2007, the research consortium and the research group have been directed by Guillaume Caumon. The structure has been continuing exploring and pushing the limits of geomodeling technology through original R&D capitalizing on more than 25 years of research and development.

 

Luc Buatois received the Outstanding Student Paper Award at the High Performance Computing Conference for his work on GPGPU computing. You can access the HPCC conference paper, the {following publi 2031 journal paper} and the corresponding Concurrent Number Cruncher computer code.